Cruising Strait of Georgia

Orca Straight of GeorgiaThe Strait of Georgia or the Georgia Strait narrow passage of the eastern North Pacific between the central east coast of Vancouver Island and the southwest mainland of British Columbia, Canada. The Strait of Georgia is home to more than 3000 species include many of world giants such as the world’s largest octopus, 100-year-old rockfish, vast schools of herring and salmon, millions of birds, as well as seals and sea lions, dolphins and whales, including the iconic southern resident killer whales.

It averages 138 miles (222 km) in length and 17 miles (28 km) in width. To the north the strait ends in a jumble of islands separating it from Johnstone and Queen Charlotte straits farther north. The southern end is marked by the San Juan Islands of the U.S. state of Washington. Texada and Lasqueti islands are the largest within the strait, which has a midchannel depth of 900–1,200 feet (275–370 m). The mainland coast is cut by many inlets, one of which is the mouth of the Fraser River and the site of Vancouver. The Fraser’s outflow aids a general counterclockwise movement of water in the strait, known locally as the Gulf. The strait forms a link in the scenic and sheltered Inside Passage sea route between Seattle, Washington, and Skagway, Alaska.